Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Numbers Don't Lie. Anesthesiologists Are More Qualified Than CRNA's.


Forget the false equivalency that the AANA tries to propagate. Real life hard numbers don't lie. Anesthesiologists are eminently more qualified to treat their patients than CRNA's. The ASA's When Seconds Count campaign clearly demonstrates the superior and more rigorous training anesthesiologists undergo compared to CRNA's. How can anybody reasonably say that 2,500 hours of nurse training is the same as 16,000 hours of training by anesthesiologists? One has to be toking on their medical marijuana to not see the difference.

Despite the very obvious disparity in experience, the AANA continues its aggressive tactics to legalize independent practice for CRNA's. After losing the battle to have the VA hospitals use nurse anesthetists without physician supervision, they are now focusing their sights, and their money, on Capitol Hill. H.R. 1783, deceptively titled Improving Veterans Access to Quality Care Act, would write into law the requirement that VA hospitals allow independent practice for advanced practice nurses, which includes CRNA's. This is the AANA's way of circumventing the decision made by the Department of Veterans Affairs just a few months ago.

Though the department is unlikely to revisit the issue so shortly after they already made a decision, the ASA will need to be vigilant to make sure the bill doesn't get snuck into some larger legislation without anybody noticing. Can't put anything past people who refuse to acknowledge the distinction between having 2,500 versus 16,000 hours of training.

33 comments:

  1. Bahahahah. What an opinion piece! This shows such a lack of research... I recently had surgery and was lied to by the anesthesiologist who said that they would be "in there doing the anesthesia." Of course, I find out that an amazing CRNA did my entire anesthesia without one ounce of help from a DOCTOR......

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  2. Where is this program where I can become a CRNA 5 years after high school? I call bullsh*t.

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  3. When seconds count great Z writes a BS article cause its the only way he can get traffic on his page.

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  4. Wait.. wait... So your site looks like it is from your basement, yet you seem to know the end all, be all training of nurse anesthetists? Oh Puh-lease. Before you write propaganda that insults those who actually care for patients in the OR, do your honest research.

    BTW- I'm damn fine at my job. I am an independent provider, and provide safe, affordable care- without you.

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  5. Lies, damned lies, and statistics. Ologists trot out this crap because they know they have zero data (despite millions of anesthetics to draw from) to show that their care is in any way superior. Fear mongering at its best.

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  6. I would do some research before posting wrong facts. Unless, your end goal is to appear too lazy to research/fact check, in which you have excelled at.

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  7. Where are the studies that compare length of training to outcomes? Seems like an important detail left out. Maybe intentional??

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  8. 5 years after high school?! Not possible.

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  9. I'm sure Joan Rivers is glad she had not one, but three anesthesiologists. ..

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    1. Lauren Maloney Phoenix CRNA MSApril 19, 2017 at 6:15 AM

      The public deserves the right to choose their anesthesia needs based on outcome history and affordability. The Anesthesiologists are scared because 10 studies show the same outcomes regardless of the anesthesia provider. With huge deductibles, bundling of third party reimbursements, and increased transparency of health care costs, health care consumers are asking some intelligent questions. One important question is "Why do I have to pay an anesthesiologist when I don't need one?" I don't begrudge any anesthesiologist all of their hard work, but when the rubber meets the road, it's just going to come down to quality and affordability for consumers. Over qualification doesn't equal necessity.

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  10. Lol more #FakeNews and #EvidenceByProclimaton

    https://tinyurl.com/gptt7ay

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  11. Numbers don't lie. It takes the average Anesthesiologist twice as long to learn how to do the exact same job. You're in a nursing specialty. Just own it. CRNAs know it, and so do your physician colleagues.

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    1. Those Anesthesiologists must really be dumb asses if it takes them twice as long to learn how to do the same job as a CRNA! Ha Ha.

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  12. I work everyday doing a myriad of cases, thanks for using all that training to do my h&p's. I couldn't do it without you.

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  13. Let's add the numbers
    - BSN, 4 YEARS (over 1,000 hours of clinical practica)

    - ICU experience with board certification in Critical Care, 1-3 years (2,000 - 6,000 hours of critical care)

    Nurse Anesthesia school, 2.5 - 3 years (over 2,500 hours of actually​ administrating anesthesia)

    Time to become a CRNA after high school 7.5 - 10 years!

    *physician anesthesia training includes 3 years of actual Anesthesia and hours are calculated from the time they enter the building to the time they exit. Therefore, lounge, lunch, bathroom breaks, sleeping, etc... all count towards their inflated 12,000 - 26,000 hours.

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  14. 16,000 hours to become a lazy ass-hole? What a waste.

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  15. When seconds count, don't go for the anesthesiologist...because they can't even count...

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    1. If you have enough time to be counting seconds...you might be a nurse...

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  16. The only thing more ridiculous than the fake numbers this guys comes up with is the incredibly offensive salary these anesthesiologists make. They make over 300K a year to do advanced nursing work.

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  17. Numbers do lie when they are wrong numbers.

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  18. ive never seen so many posts by CRNAs on this site hahah. looks like the truth hurts

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  19. It's this guy's blog, if you dont like it then dont read it.

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  20. I know of hospitals that have anesthesiologists supervising nurse anesthetists. From what I've seen and heard, the nurse anesthetists are the ones in the room the entire time, for the whole procedure. What is the anesthesiologist doing during their long break while someone else is working? Sounds its too many people hired for the job. Like when you see lots of people at a construction site, but only 1 person actually shoveling. No wonder why it costs so much to have surgery done. You're paying for more people that aren't necessary.

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  21. And if you're claiming that seconds count, how many seconds does it take to go from the physician lounge or physician offices to the patient in the operating room that would actually need help?

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  22. Hmmmmm�� Did 4 cases yesterday... and day before... never saw anesthesiologist in the room except for a coffee break and watched them play on their phones in the lounge ���� Every single one of my patients went to sleep and woke up beautifully

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  23. Wildly ridiculous opinion piece with absolutely made up numbers. I had 4.5 years of my BSN education including 2 years of clinical rotation when I graduated and worked in the ICU. I trained and learned critical care for 4 years aka over 8000 clinical hours when I started my doctorate CRNA program. When I graduate in 3 years from this full time doctorate program I will have had 7.5 years of didactic education, 4 of which included clinical rotations and 4 years of ICU training totaling 12 years of training for my career as a CRNA. Let's leave all your alternative facts for politics.

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    1. So why didn't you just go to medical school in the first place, Mr. Overeducated Nurse? Don't make it sound as if every CRNA took that long.

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  24. Unfortunately misleading piece. The numbers don't add up and honestly, so doesn't the claim. CRNAs deliver safe and affordable care every single day.

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  25. Lots of comments--I suspect by nurses--about physician lounges, and being lazy. Unprofessional. Maybe go to medical school and become board certified if you want to be a physician anesthesiologist.

    Otherwise, accept the technical role of nurses in hospitals: Nurses went to school to become technicians with very limited responsibilities, not decisions makers. They are valued, but their role is sharply defined and separate from that of a physician.

    Sorry if nurses feel tricked by the nature of US healthcare system, but nobody else made your decisions for them, and there is no excuse in this information age to not know better. Radiology technicians will not replace radiologists, just like PC Nurse Practitioners wont replace PCPs. If some nurses don't want to be a part of the team, then they wont be treated as such by physicians.

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  26. Difficult to compare the two. CRNA's lean heavier on work experience while MD's look to formal education. If one is really wondering then a provider who is both a nurse and a doc would have the best perspective. The anesthesiologist will log more case hours than a CRNA, because his/her training is longer. Whether or not this matters, or at what point a person becomes competent is the real question.

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  27. You know why CRNAs are better? Because they're not out there trying to convince everyone that they are better. Someone has a major inferiority complex

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